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14 Hands Barnwood

In honor of the agricultural history of the Prosser area, we've gathered a collection of reclaimed wood from several barns in eastern Washington and created a beautiful display here in the 14 Hands tasting room. We hope you enjoy viewing the installations and reading about the families who generously donated the wood for this tribute.

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Built 1949

Grow Family Farm

Millie and Norton Grow started farming in the early 1950s with crops including hay, grass seed, apples, asparagus, and mint. Several of the barns on their land were built out of reclaimed wood from bomb crates that had been used in World War II.

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Built Circa 1890

Coates Family Barn

Millie and Norton Grow started farming in the early 1950s with crops including hay, grass seed, apples, asparagus, and mint. Several of the barns on their land were built out of reclaimed wood from bomb crates that had been used in World War II.

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Built Circa 1890

Mercer Lambing Shed

Looking to expand their lambing operation, brothers Bill and Milt Mercer purchased land in 1940 and built this barn, among others. Today, the shearing shed and one lambing shed still stand. The lambing shed was used to provide a safe and warm spot for ewes with newborn lambs.

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Built 1935

Berg Family Barn

The Berg farm was originally a sheep ranch, and the barn was built entirely by hand. The family still farms the land, but has moved on to irrigated crops like grass seed, alfalfa, peas, corn, carrots, onions and potatoes.

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Built 1914

Marble Barn

The Sorensen family purchased the century-old Marble Barn in 1993 from the Marble family, who had owned the barn for over 50 years. Originally used as a milk barn, the barn features a 250-ton silo and is listed on the National Register of Historical Places.

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Built 1974

Weld Barn

As soon as Wendell Weld and his wife Charlotte got married, the first thing they purchased was a horse. The couple built this barn on their property in 1974 to house their horses and to this day, the barn is still used to store hay.

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Built Circa 1935

Washara Hillvue Barn

Lorraine Christian built the Washara Hillvue barn on his dairy farm in the mid-1930s. The barn got its unique name from a naming contest that Lorraine held for the entire town of Prosser: Washara, which means “beautiful” and Hillvue, a tribute to the barn’s view of the Horse Heaven Hills.

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Built 1974

Cupola Barn

The Cupola Barn has been part of owner Sean Tudor’s life since well before he owned it—he actually lived near the barn growing up. As an adult, Sean purchased the vineyard property where the barn stood and eventually moved the barn to a new location just up the hill.

Built 2001

Mary's Barn

When Tom Freepons built this barn for his daughter Mary, he wanted to make sure it fit in with older barns in the area, so he designed it to have a Western aesthetic—from the roofline to the bright red color.

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Built Circa 1900

Young Ranch Barn

The Young family barn was built in the early 1900s to house horses, cattle and chickens. In the 1940s, the Youngs stopped ranching and turned to wheat farming instead. The land is no longer used for farming, but the barn remains standing.

Built Circa 1920

Anderson Family Barn

The Anderson family settled in the Rattlesnake Hills more than a century ago. In addition to raising livestock and horses, the Anderson family also grew wheat and rye early on, before irrigation was introduced.

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